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Writing to Music 2: You responded

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post on Writing to Music. I asked you:

What music do you use to write to?

 And you reponded!
***

Some of you can’t listen to anything at all:

Many people suggested (as did Janel in the comments to the original blog):

I have found that I can’t really write to music that has lyrics. I just got distracted by the words. So I usually listen to epic videogame or epic film soundtracks, classical, or ambient dance music to write.

Lots of you need something inspiring, energising, that makes you happy:

For some people, music is so integral to their writing process that it gets mentioned in their acknowledgements:

The responses reminded me of a much earlier conversation I’d had on Twitter with some classical musicians:

I said “I listen to mindless, cheerful bubblegum pop to write. I find it hard to listen to anything when I read. But my students say ‘THE BEST are orchestral film sound tracks’

Certainly my partner likes to listen to Bach’s The Well-Tempered Clavier… or increasingly, silence to write to.

I found the variety of responses absolutely fascinating. And, since I’m always looking for more music to add to my playlist–I hope this inspires you!

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