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The Times Higher Education Blog reposts ‘The five biggest reading mistakes’

Katherine Firth on why you should approach texts less like a Victorian maiden and more like a pirate hero.

One of my most popular posts recently, ‘So here are the five biggest reading mistakes I see and how to avoid them‘, was featured in Times Higher Education. It’s always great to feel that what I’m writing helps other people!

In spite of the Jack Sparrow gif, the adventures the reading ‘hero’ is encouraged to go on were drawn from children’s books, from 18th-century amatory fiction (where the protagonist is usually a feisty woman), from this essay ‘We Have Always Fought’: Challenging the ‘Women, Cattle and Slaves’ Narrative. So please consider ‘hero’ to be completely gender neutral–go, everyone, everywhere, and read like a pirate!

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