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Yet another book? Yes, but the last one for a while, I promise!

Just popping into the blog to say that Level Up your Essays, the new book with Inger and Shaun, is now out in the world. It is beautiful, red-lacquered and shiny. The pages are generous, and the worksheets invite you to get in there and scribble all over them.

While this book isn’t aimed primarily at PhD students or researchers, there are a few golden resources that will definitely be relevant for you. I love our section on ways to make logical progressions using the LATCH principles (Location, Alphabet, Time, Category, Hierarchy) (thanks Inger!), the Cornell Method of Notetaking (something you know I’m passionate about), and some advice about writing academic English as a second language (thanks Shaun!).

This book is also useful to anyone who is teaching undergraduates to write (most researchers are teachers too!). It can be challenging to give feedback in ways that really help students improve. We have simple, fun explanations of how to use graduate-level strategies in ways that undergraduates can use: like Swales and Feak’s sentence skeletons or Kristen Luker’s bedraggled daisies strategy.

Even better, this book is about half the price of even my other ‘affordable’ books. Available in paperback or ebook at all the usual outlets!

This book collects together a lot of work I was doing back when I was an Academic Skills Advisor, when I had just started this blog. The blog was such a great resource in writing this book, as well as being a place to reflect on the process of working in an authorship team, writing a book, editing it, and getting it published. Thank you for your part of being on this journey!

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Succeeding in a Research Higher Degree

Doing a Research Higher Degree (like a PhD) is hard, but lots of people have succeeded and you can too. It’s easier if you understand how it works, this blog gives you the insider view.

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